How Filipinos Are Alike According To These Pinoys


It’s a tough time right now in the Philippines. Although some circumstances are not exactly pleasant, they don’t necessarily define the entirety of Filipinos. Here are some interesting and pleasant things about us and our culture as shared by these “kababayan” or incredible fellow Pinoys (because who would know us better than ourselves?):

Filipinos are family-oriented.


The most Filipino thing about me is my unconditional love for my relatives and friends. I care deeply for my family and the bonds I create with my friends because they are a priority to me. I believe that the people I have in my life have shaped me into who I am today more than I have. I depend on them for support, wisdom, and advice because they are the ones who are the closest to me. I grew up in a culture where it's second nature to turn to family when in need. – Faith Sumastre, Canada


Filipinos’ second language is English.
I think what foreigners don't usually know [about Filipinos] is that, even though the Philippines is a third-world country, when you come to the Philippines, you can talk to almost everybody in English. And they will gladly converse with you. Regardless of the social class, everybody here knows how to speak English so language is not really a barrier. – Julia Tabor, Philippines

Filipinos will always make you feel at home.
If you’re a “bisita” (guest), expect “Kumain ka na ba?” (Have you eaten already?) as greetings. Special treatment and the occassional merienda can be anticipated as well! – Summer, Philippines

Filipinos have uniquely weird, nice traditions. Gentle reminder: don't forget to utter the words “mano po” before you “bless” or “mano” your grandparents.


Filipinos have weird traditions, and we're supposed to "bless" our elders. That means when we greet them, we take their hand, and press their knuckles to our foreheads lightly. It's a sign of respect to your elders. – Gwen Peralta, New Jersey

Filipinos’ favorite traditions are fiestas.

Although I am an introvert, I enjoy fiestas because there's a strange sense of belonging that comes with these annual celebrations. The spirit of community permeates the streets; Filipino cuisine is served at the table; videoke and beer go hand-in-hand-- what's not to love? In a country like the Philippines, joy is best shared with family, friends, and even neighbors! These festivals bring out the fun in all of us, and fun is almost always served with delicious food. – Ysa Navarro, Philippines

Filipinos have a thing for Lechon. And it's everywhere in the Philippines.
As cliché as it sounds, it's hard to pick just one Filipino food since everything is just so yummy! But I guess one of my favorites would be Lechon! The taste alone (especially the crunchy skin) is more than enough to call it my favorite. As long as it's fresh and still crispy, Lechon is good anywhere in the Philippines.
In Manila, they give a unique spin on the usual Lechon and stuff it with either rice, vegetables, or pancit


Apart from the taste, Lechon is something which evokes memories for me; in the Philippines, it is usually served during special occasions. Although you can technically eat it anytime since some restaurants have it as a regular item in their menu, I wouldn't recommend doing so because of all the cholesterol! Anyway, like every other Filipino, I'm pretty sure it's been served in every special gathering I've attended. From the birthdays I've celebrated to fancy weddings, simple town fiestas to family reunions, I can assure you that there was Lechon. – Eusela Landrito, Philippines

Filipinos love to keep themselves happy.


We are always cheerful enough to smile, laugh, and have fun. Although we encounter circumstances like devastating calamities, violence, and financial problems, we are able to smile. It proves the resiliency of Filipinos when facing many challenges in life, whether great or small. – Julius Venz Dela Cruz, Philippines

Text by Sam Fabian
Visual by Faith Sumastre

3 comments

  1. Loved it!!! So happy to have learned some facts about another culture, in such a fun way.

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